Where are they now?

  • Where Are They Now’ – Taury Phelps

    Taury Phelps, a 2017 graduate of Mount Vernon High School, is currently enrolled as a sophomore at Ithaca College. There, Phelps is building an undergraduate foundation on which she hopes to build a career in education. She’s currently an education major but is considering switching to a major in the field of communications and graduating with a minor in English Education.

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  • ‘Where Are They Now’ – Tyrone R. Shaw

    Tyrone R. Shaw, a 2006 graduate of Mount Vernon High School, has been a teacher at McKinley Technology High School in Washington, D.C. for the past six years. There, he teaches World History, AP World History, and an elective focused on social justice, the Holocaust and genocide studies. His courses are offered to students in grades 9-12.

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  • Where Are They Now? – Shadae Leslie

    Shadae Leslie, a 2016 Mount Vernon High School graduate, is currently in her junior year at Boston University. There, she is pursuing an undergraduate degree in Public Relations at the College of Communications. She also expects to graduate in the spring of 2020 with a minor in African American Studies.

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  • District Programs Fuel MVHS Alumna’s Passion for STEM and Career at IBM

    Merlina Escorcia, a 2014 graduate of Mount Vernon High School and recent UConn alumna, began working as an engineer with IBM in June 2018. She credits programs she was introduced to as a student in Mount Vernon for her passion for technology and current career path.

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  • MVHS Alumnus William Phillips Puts Technology Education to Use at University of Buffalo

    William Phillips, a 2017 graduate of Mount Vernon High School, recently placed first in his category as a Computer Science and Engineering student at the CSTEP (Collegiate Science and Technology Entry Program) Research Poster Symposium. Phillips is an incoming sophomore and computer science major at the University at Buffalo. His recent accomplishment was the result of an 8.5-week-long intensive research program under the direction of SUNY Buffalo professor Dr. Kris Schindler and graduate student Dominque Hickson.

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